Agri-Food Pilot Program

The Agri-Food Pilot is an immigration program providing permanent residence for temporary workers with full-time jobs, they should be non-seasonal in-Canada and outside the province of Quebec and have work experience in some agri-food industries and agricultural.

Eligibility requirements
To be accepted for The Agri-Food Pilot, you should meet the below requirements.

Experience
You should have the following work experience:

  • Minimum 1-year experience in an accepted occupation (NOC) and industry (NAICS), check the list below for more details.
  • you should have a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) in your current temporary work for at least 1 year.
  • your job should conform to the NOC; means you should complete the tasks of the NOC, including all of the essential duties;
  • your job should be a paid job, so no volunteer work or unpaid internships.
  • self-employment and unauthorized work will not be counted in the work experience.

Accepted NAICS and NOC:

Only the list below of the industry (NAICS) and occupations (NOC) are accepted under the Agri-Food Pilot program for both work experience and a job offer.

One of the NAICS codes below must be one of the employers’ primary business activities and your NOC in the contract should be one of the mentioned NOC’s under the same NAICS of your employer.

  • NAICS – 1114 Greenhouse, nursery and floriculture production
    • NOC – 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors, and specialized livestock workers
    • NOC – 8431 General farmworkers
    • NOC – 8611 Harvesting laborers
  • NAICS – 1121 Cattle ranching and farming
    • NOC – 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors, and specialized livestock workers
    • NOC – 8431 General farmworkers
  • NAICS – 1122 Hog and pig farming
    • NOC – 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors, and specialized livestock workers
    • NOC – 8431 General farmworkers
  • NAICS – 1123 Poultry and egg production
    • NOC – 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors, and specialized livestock workers
    • NOC – 8431 General farmworkers
  • NAICS – 1124 Sheep and goat farming
    • NOC – 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors, and specialized livestock workers
    • NOC – 8431 General farmworkers
  • NAICS – 1129 Other animal production
    • NOC – 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors, and specialized livestock workers
    • NOC – 8431 General farmworkers
  • NAICS – 3116 Meat product manufacturing
    • NOC – 6331 Butchers, meat cutters and fishmongers – retail and wholesale
    • NOC – 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors, and specialized livestock workers
    • NOC – 9462 Industrial butchers and meat cutters, poultry preparers and related workers
    • NOC – 9617 Labourers in food and beverage processing

Job offer

Your job offer should  have the below requirements:

  • full-time job offer in accepted occupation (NOC), and non-seasonal and outside the province of Quebec.
  • Work offer with no end date (indeterminate period CDI)
  • The employer should have one of the accepted industry (NAICS) in his business activities.
  • for an accepted wage that is above the median wage of that specific NOC in the province where you are working, to check the wages for all NOC’s in all provinces, you can check the Job Bank.

You should submit an “Offer of Employment to a Foreign National – Agri-Food pilot [IMM 0115] (PDF, 2.0 MB) with your application. Your employer should complete this form and send you a copy that should be included with your application. You should read and sign the declaration at the bottom of the form.

Temporary resident status

If you are in Canada, you should maintain your temporary resident status during the processing of your application for permanent residence.

Working in Canada

You should show that you meet the employment requirements of the job you are offered. These may include education, training, or other qualifications in the NOC description.

Qualifications assessment and licensing are required for some occupations, you should be aware of these issues when you consider immigrating to Canada.

See “Planning to Work in Canada” (PDF, 2 MB) for more information.

 

Regulated occupations

Twenty percent (20%) of people working in Canada work in jobs that are regulated to protect the health and safety of Canadians. Examples include:

  • nurses
  • engineers
  • electricians
  • teachers

Provincial and territorial regulatory bodies are responsible for

  • establishing entry requirements for individual occupations
  • recognizing prior credentials, training, and experience
  • issuing licenses required to practice

The recognition process varies between provinces and territories and between occupations. Recognizing qualifications and issuing licenses can generally only be done in Canada. The process can take time. You may be asked to:

  • provide documentation of qualifications
  • do a language exam (which may differ from those needed for immigration)
  • complete a technical exam (with accompanying fee)
  • do supervised work

Non-regulated occupations

For non-regulated occupations, there are no set requirements and there is no legal requirement to get a license. The employer will set the standards and could ask for registration with a professional association.

Qualifications assessment

A qualifications assessment is advice on how qualifications from another country compare to Canadian qualifications. An assessment does not guarantee that:

  • a regulatory body will issue you a license to practice
  • your credentials will be accepted by a Canadian employer

However, having your qualifications assessed will help you understand the Canadian educational system and help you with your job search.

To have your qualifications assessed by one of the provincial evaluation services, consult the “How to get an educational credential assessment” page.

Education

For the Agri-Food Pilot, you should meet the education requirements below:

  • You should have a high-school diploma, post-secondary certificate or degree that is valid and equal to a Canadian equivalent, or
  • If you did not complete your studies in Canada, you will need an Education Credential Assessment (ECA) to show that your studies are equal to a Canadian secondary or post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree, or
  • If your foreign credential is not equivalent to a Canadian secondary or post-secondary degree, you will need an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) to show that your credential is issued from an educational or training institution recognized by the official authorities of the country of origin. Your credential should be equal to a secondary or post-secondary degree in the country where it was issued.
  • Your ECA report should be less than five years old on the date we received your application.

Language requirements

  • You should meet the minimum language requirements in the Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) or the “Niveaux de competence linguistique” canadiens (NCLC) for listening, speaking, reading, and writing at level 4 (or above) across all language abilities.
  • You will need to do mandatory language testing with a designated organization and submit your original results with your application.
  • If you have already done language testing, your test results should not be more than 2 years old on the date your application is received.

Funds needed to settle in Canada

The government of Canada provides no financial support to new immigrants. Unless you are already working in Canada and that work is authorized, you should prove that you have enough money unencumbered by debts or obligations to support yourself and your family members after you arrive in Canada.

You should submit proof with your application to show that you have enough money to support yourself and your family after you arrive in Canada. Examples of documents you can submit are:

  • current bank statements or certification letter
  • proof of your savings balance
  • deposit statements

You cannot borrow this money from another person. You should be able to use this money to pay the costs of living for your family (even if they are not coming with you).

The amount of money you need to support your family is set by the size of your family and is based on 50% of the low-income cut-off totals for urban areas. We update these amounts every year on IRCC’s website.

Number of family members Funds you need
(in Canadian dollars)
1 $12,960
2 $16,135
3 $19,836
4 $24,083
5 $27,315
6 $30,806
7 $34,299
For each additional family member $3,492

We strongly recommend that you research the cost of living in the region of Canada where you plan to live. Bring with you as much money as possible to make your establishment in Canada easier.

Disclosure of funds

If you arrive in Canada with an amount greater or equal to CAN$10,000, or the equivalent in a foreign currency, you should tell this to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officer. These funds could be in the form of:

  • cash,
  • securities in bearer form (for example, stocks, bonds, debentures, treasury bills), or
  • bankers’ drafts, cheques, travelers’ cheques, or money orders.

Biometric (fingerprints and photo) requirements

You and your family members may need to appear in person to have their fingerprints and photograph (biometric information) taken at a biometric collection service point.

Find out if you need to give biometrics.

If you have to give biometrics, you can give them after you:

  • pay for and submit your application and biometric fees, and
  • get a Biometric Instruction Letter (BIL) which will direct you to a list of biometric collection service points you may choose from

You should bring the BIL with you to the biometric collection service point to give your biometrics.

We encourage you to give your biometrics as soon as possible after getting the BIL. We’ll start processing your application after we get your biometrics.

Where to give your biometrics

You need to book an appointment to give your biometrics at one of these official biometric collection service points.

 

 

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